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Archive | March, 2013

SholomHome

Sholom Home site to be brought to life as a new senior housing facility

Posted on 15 March 2013 by robwas66

SholomHomeBy DEBORAH BROTZ

The Sholom East site building will soon be brought back to life. Plans to renovate and establish a senior housing facility at the location will soon be under way.

When the Sholom Alliance sold The Sholom East site building to Traditions SP Land, LLC, on June 6, 2011, the purchaser announced renovation plans for a senior housing facility. But, in August 2012, due to a holdup in the financing for the renovation, the building was added to St. Paul’s Vacant Building Program. Four months ago, a new ownership group was formed, which will be going ahead with renovation plans for a senior housing facility.

When the building was first sold, a senior housing facility was the best choice for the building.

“That has been the building’s historic use,” said Rhett McSweeney, principal developer for Senior Investors, LCC. “For the principals in the company, that was the intent from the start.”

McSweeney projects there will be approximately 155 units of senior housing with a range of independent to assisted living. In addition to a memory unit, there will be a mix of one- and two-bedroom units. Renovations are needed in order to have senior housing at the location.

“The type of senior services that will be provided are a lot different than what was offered at Sholom Home,” said McSweeney. “They had near to 300 beds. We’re going to have 155. Instead of nursing home rooms, we’ll have some bedroom dementia units, some one- and two-bedroom units, some independent living units, and some assisted living units.”

The building was added to St. Paul’s Vacant Building Program due to time constraints in getting all the permits.

“All the permits haven’t been pulled to do the conversion,” said McSweeney. “It’s a pretty wide open designation. Before we start construction, we have to have a global walk through with all the departments in the City. We do it all together.”

A new ownership group was formed to develop the property.

“The existing ownership had decided they wanted to sell the project rather than develop it on their own,” said McSweeney. “So, the new ownership group has an option on the property to be the end developer.”

Ebenezer Homes was chosen by the new ownership group to run the facility.

“They were chosen because of their well-respected reputation in the Twin Cities,” said McSweeney. “They are the premiere provider of senior housing with services. They’re part of Fairview Health Services. They are the top provider in the state. We’re very excited to have them come to Como Park.”

The renovated building will have 40 memory-dementia units, 80 assisted living units, and 35 independent living units.

“Every part of the building will get touched,” said McSweeney. “It will include all the mechanical and all the electrical and some renovations to the exterior. There will be all new flooring, ceiling tiles, and lighting. It will be like a brand-new building. It will be great for the neighborhood and the whole area.

We’re excited.”

Renovation is expected to begin sometime this summer, in June or July.

“There is a vital need in the community as it gets older to provide a place for seniors to get care,” said McSweeney. “It’s an opportunity to add a lot of value to the community and to build a strong business. If we can help people and find a way to make a living doing it, it’s a wonderful combination.”

At a January 2013 Community Council Meeting, McSweeney indicated that he would stay in touch with District 10 with updates on the project. He also said, “If I failed you as a neighbor in the past, I won’t fail you again.”

“I had some issues with the neighbors and transient people hanging out on the property, not getting rid of snow, and issues with the back lawn,” he said. “If we haven’t addressed it in the past, it won’t be the case in the future. We’re monitoring the property at a pretty high level right now.”

McSweeney hopes the neighborhood will be pleased with the renovated building.

“We hope that we’ll make the build out first class, get it filled up, and provide the best care in St. Paul for the next 30 years,” he said.

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HeartwoodFest

Save the date: Hamline Midway’s Heartwood Festival 2013

Posted on 15 March 2013 by robwas66

HeartwoodFestHamline Midway Coalition is proud to announce the date of the fourth annual Hamline Midway Heartwood Festival: Saturday, June 1, 2013!

The Hamline Midway Heartwood Festival is a celebration of community, sustainability, and art at Newell Park, 900 N. Fairview Ave. The festival kicks off with the participatory Bike Walk Parade from Hancock Rec Center to Newell Park, where guests will enjoy live entertainment, food, resource and art fairs, and activities from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

NEW this year: Help restore the historic oak woodland at Newell Park by planting trees and removing invasive species through the reNewell project. Also, look for sporting events like a community kickball tournament.

In preparation for the Bike Walk Parade, the Canvas Teen Arts Center is opening up a mask-making workshop to all community members on Thursdays from 5-7 p.m. the entire month of May at Hancock Rec Center.

Register for a booth, donate to the silent auction, volunteer, and learn more about the festival at www.hamlinemidway.org/heartwood. The Hamline Midway Heartwood Festival is planned by the Community Building Committee of Hamline Midway Coalition in partnership with St. Paul Parks and Recreation. This activity is made possible by the voters of Minnesota through a grant from the Metropolitan Regional Arts Council, thanks to a legislative appropriation from the arts and cultural heritage fund. For more information, contact Faith at 651-494-7683 or faith@hamlinemidway.org.

Hamline Midway Coalition — District Council 11 — is a community-based non-profit organization dedicated to making the Hamline Midway neighborhood a better place to live, learn, work, and play.

 

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GradeA

Tutoring makes a difference

Posted on 15 March 2013 by robwas66

GradeASince its inception in 2001, the East Side Learning Center has tutored over 1,000 students at schools across the East Side of Saint Paul. We believe that every child has the capacity to learn to read -and to love reading!

The organization’s mission is “unlocking each child’s potential through the foundation of reading”. Volunteers live this mission by providing free tutoring to children struggling to read at grade level and who are unable to get help elsewhere. Children receive personalized lesson plans and are tutored four times a week during 30-50 minute sessions with volunteer and professional tutors.

ESLC has had tremendous success tutoring at Saint Paul Music Academy (27 E. Geranium Ave) and currently has a long waiting list. The equation is simple: the more volunteers we have, the more children we can tutor. Can you be a part of the solution at Saint Paul Music Academy?

The difference you can make in the life of a child is immeasurable – join ESLC and see for yourself. The commitment is small: if you can share one hour a week for a semester then you can be a tutor. Proficiency in English is a must, and loving to work with kids is a plus. Training and support are provided by ESLC staff. We invite anyone interested in tutoring to visit and see us in action. For more information, contact Victoria Perkins at 651-793-7364 or victoria.perkins@spps.org.

 

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Hamline-Midway residents rally to support neighbor with house torched by fire

Hamline-Midway residents rally to support neighbor with house torched by fire

Posted on 15 March 2013 by robwas66

The past 12 months have been difficult ones for Dawn Cockrell. Last May, her husband died suddenly from a heart attack. Three months later, a favorite dog passed on. And a few weeks ago, the home she has lived in for the past 15 years on the 1400 block of Van Buren Street was devastated by a fire. (Photo by Stefanie Berres)

The past 12 months have been difficult ones for Dawn Cockrell. Last May, her husband died suddenly from a heart attack. Three months later, a favorite dog passed on. And a few weeks ago, the home she has lived in for the past 15 years on the 1400 block of Van Buren Street was devastated by a fire. (Photo by Stefanie Berres)

By JAN WILLMS

The past 12 months have been difficult ones for Dawn Cockrell. Last May, her husband died suddenly from a heart attack. Three months later, a favorite dog passed on. And a few weeks ago, the home she has lived in for the past 15 years on the 1400 block of Van Buren Street was devastated by a fire.

But through it all, she has been able to rely on the strong support from the neighborhood she lives in.

“The fire was last Friday, right around dinner time,” related Mary Hendrickson, who lives right next door to Cockrell. “One of the tenants living upstairs noted it and contacted Dawn. She called it in to the fire department.”

Cockrell lives in a duplex and rents out the upstairs to some college students. The fire reportedly started from a cigarette butt in a garbage can on the upper back porch.

“The Fire Department said some of the materials used for insulation really caught on fire and kept smoldering,” Hendrickson said. She opened her home to Cockrell and the upstairs tenants.

“Dawn stayed here overnight,” she said, “and the tenants stayed until about 10:30 p.m. Then they stayed over with friends.” The firefighters let them back in to pick up guitars and laptops and any other valuables.

“We heard sirens again around 1:30 a.m. Saturday,” Hendrickson said. “The fire had started up again.” The Fire Department came once more, around 5:40 a.m. Sunday morning, after the fire had ignited for a third time.

“Each time it started again, there was more damage,” Hendrickson said. “There’s nothing salvageable in the whole upper unit, and there has been a lot of water and smoke damage on the main floor. But the insurance adjuster said the house definitely can be rebuilt.”

She said all the neighbors were gathered outside Cockrell’s home, wondering what they could do. An email chain was started, with people gathering any items that might be needed.

Hendrickson said that she has a daughter in a wheelchair and a partially disabled son, and her neighbors offered right away to take them for the night in case Hendrickson’s house was at all affected by the fire.

“We went into Dawn’s house late in the evening and got her clothes out and washed them,” Hendrickson said. “My brother got her car out of a snow bank and put some fluids in it.”

Hendrickson said they tried to get Cockrell a cell phone also. “The neighbors have supported her beautifully,” she said.

“I felt really bad for the international students living upstairs,” Hendrickson added. “They lost everything, and they have no family here. But everything is okay.”

She said Cockrell has been put up in a motel in Roseville by her insurance company, and will soon be moving to semi-permanent housing in Bandana Square.

“I’m hoping in the spring, as a neighborhood, we can clean up the yard and plant some grass,” Hendrickson said.

Cockrell, reached at the motel where she is temporarily staying, said she has incredibly wonderful people in her life. “I also have health issues,” she said, “and Mary has been there for me. She opened her arms to my tenants as well.”

Cockrell was able to get her current dog, Rennie, out of the house and put up at the motel. “My brother also came down for support,” she noted.

“Liberty Mutual has been such a wonderful insurance company for me,” Cockrell said. “And I’m working with Restoration Construction. The house was engulfed in flames, and they have been cleaning everything.”

Cockrell said she did note a lot of cute firemen came out to fight the fire. “You have to have a sense of humor when things like this happen,” she added.

Hendrickson said that for now, the insurance company and restoration company are working closely with Cockrell, and what she needs most from her neighbors is just knowing she has their support. Hendrickson has no doubt that support will be there.

“We have a great neighborhood, and we all know each other and all help each other out,” Hendrickson claimed.

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St. Paul Central Students to Go to Washington, D.C. for WorldQuest Competition in April

St. Paul Central Students to Go to Washington, D.C. for WorldQuest Competition in April

Posted on 15 March 2013 by robwas66

The Minnesota International Center (MIC) is sending a team from St. Paul Central High School, all expenses paid, to represent Minnesota at the National Academic WorldQuest Competition, sponsored by the World Affairs Councils of America (WACA), in Washington, D.C. on April 27, 2013. From left to right in the photo are the Consul General of Canada for the upper Midwest Jamshed Merchant, Bhavanna Suvarna, Linnea Peterson, Haroun Khalid, Elsa Mundt, Ethan Cherin (Central teacher and team coach), and Carol Ingebretson Byrne, president of the Minnesota International Center.

The Minnesota International Center (MIC) is sending a team from St. Paul Central High School, all expenses paid, to represent Minnesota at the National Academic WorldQuest Competition, sponsored by the World Affairs Councils of America (WACA), in Washington, D.C. on April 27, 2013. From left to right in the photo are the Consul General of Canada for the upper Midwest Jamshed Merchant, Bhavanna Suvarna, Linnea Peterson, Haroun Khalid, Elsa Mundt, Ethan Cherin (Central teacher and team coach), and Carol Ingebretson Byrne, president of the Minnesota International Center.

The Minnesota International Center (MIC) is sending a team from St. Paul Central High School, all expenses paid, to represent Minnesota at the National Academic WorldQuest Competition, sponsored by the World Affairs Councils of America (WACA), in Washington, D.C. on April 27, 2013.

Central’s team comprising Haroun Khalid, Elsa Mundt, Linnea Peterson and Bhavana Suvarna was the winner of the local Academic WorldQuest Competition, sponsored by MIC and held at the General Mills campus on Wednesday, February 6. 17 teams from metro area high schools competed to answer questions on U.S. Economic Competitiveness; U.S. Education: Competing Globally; U.S. Energy Policy; the Middle East; Afghanistan/Pakistan; China; U.N. Millennium Goals: Environmental Sustainability; Geography; Current Events and the Cuban Missile Crisis.

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Postman set to retire, plans marathon walk for charity

Postman set to retire, plans marathon walk for charity

Posted on 15 March 2013 by robwas66

When he retires on March 30 after 31 years as a letter carrier, Gary Fitch, 61, is not going to sit back, put his legs up, and watch television. Instead, he is going to keep on walking. In April 2014, Fitch is planning a walk from International Falls to St. Paul to raise funds to end hunger in Minnesota. (Photo by Jan Willms)

When he retires on March 30 after 31 years as a letter carrier, Gary Fitch, 61, is not going to sit back, put his legs up, and watch television. Instead, he is going to keep on walking. In April 2014, Fitch is planning a walk from International Falls to St. Paul to raise funds to end hunger in Minnesota. (Photo by Jan Willms)

By JAN WILLMS

When he retires on March 30 after 31 years as a letter carrier, Gary Fitch, 61, is not going to sit back, put his legs up, and watch television. He is not going to go fishing. He is not going to pack up and travel with his wife in an RV.

Instead, he is going to keep on walking. In April 2014, Fitch is planning a walk from International Falls to St. Paul to raise funds to end hunger in Minnesota. His 12-mile route around Como Lake with the Arlington Branch Post Office has given him lots of practice.

But he hopes to have others join him in this trek. Fellow union members, athletes, politicians, celebrities and everyone who has a job and can take a day off are invited to walk for part of the journey.

Fitch is not a novice when it comes to promoting a cause, although in the past he has mainly biked across country.

“Forty years ago I was in the Marine Corps, and I should have died,” the gravelly-voiced, slender postman recalled in a recent interview. He was serving in Memphis, TN, when a drunk driver ran him off the road.

“I had 169 stitches in my face,” he said. “And they weren’t sure if my right leg would ever function. I was in a coma for a week. My family came down, and I didn’t even recognize them.”

“But being a Marine, I got myself back in shape,” Fitch said. “I needed to give thanks to somebody. So I hooked up with Danny Thomas and the St. Jude Foundation.” He set up a bike ride from St. Paul to Memphis in 1974 with St. Judes, and he also was honoring a young cousin who died from leukemia.

Fitch later received a call from the Ronald McDonald House, where a little boy wanted him to deliver a letter to the president. “It took me two years,” Fitch explained, “and he died six months before I got on the road. But I delivered his letter and 4,000 others from children who were ill to President George H.W. Bush in 1989.”

After the tsunami in 2004 that swept so many people to their deaths, Fitch again felt he needed to do something. He talked with officials at NASA and Sue Anderson, from NASA’s education department. He gathered letters with hopes and dreams, mostly from children, but also from adults, on a bike trip from Seattle to Washington, DC, in 2007.

“I talked to elementary kids in the Twin Cities and got 1700 letters from here,” he noted. By the time he finished his bike trip, he ended up with 23,651 letters describing people’s wishes. It took seven months to get the letters on a flash drive, and that flash drive went up on the Atlantis in 2009.

NASA sent him pictures, and explained that the letters would circle the globe 92 times. “I told the kids they put a circle of hope around earth 92 times. What next?” Fitch said.

What has come next has been his concern for the children in the Twin Cities who go to bed hungry every night. And because he does what he does, Fitch has decided to do something about it.

He has sat down with a number of people and talked about his goal, raising enough money to buy 10 million pounds of food. The interest from the funds raised will keep the state hunger-free forever, according to Fitch.

He has given himself a year to prepare for this. “If I weren’t planning this walk, I would never have retired,” Fitch noted. But he hopes to spend the next year meeting and talking with people.

“It’s a grass roots labor movement,” he explained. He hopes to represent 385,000 union members. He belongs to Branch 28 of the National Association of Letter Carriers. He has spoken with the AFL-CIO, and hopes to talk to St. Paul and Minneapolis unions in the coming months.

“I’m getting really good at this,” Fitch said with a smile. “For some reason, I feel the people around me when I am talking. And I want to ask everybody who knows anybody to put me in touch with them.”

Fitch said he lives paycheck to paycheck like everyone else. But his pension will cover his house payments. He is going to need help with gas expenses.

He is printing out 50,000 pledge forms.

“If people understand the principle behind this, everyone will come on board,” Fitch stated. “It’s just a matter of reaching as many people as I can over the next year.”

He said everything else he has done has been on a moral level. “My heart is in this, also,” Fitch affirmed, “but we have a monetary goal with this one. And it will be so little out of anyone’s pockets.”

He reflected that life has been good to him. “I have a roof over my head and a full belly,” he said. “But I should have died back in 1971, and I refuse to take anything for granted. I want to help everyone in Minnesota perform this miracle.” For further information about the walk to end hunger, go to www.minnesotamiracle.com

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Groundswell celebrates expansion at Thomas and Hamline

Groundswell celebrates expansion at Thomas and Hamline

Posted on 15 March 2013 by robwas66

Groundswell_FeaturedStory

Groundswell staff gathered at a recent open house for the coffee shop. From left, Megan Gruelich, Jessie James and daughter Zola and Seth McCoy. (Photo by Jan Willms)

By JAN WILLMS

For the past 10 years, there has been a coffee shop at the corner of Thomas and Hamline. But now, Groundswell Coffee is celebrating an expansion and will be offering food, selling arts and crafts and by April 12, hopes to have its beer and wine license in place.

To assist with funding the expansion, Hamline Midway neighbors Seth McCoy and Tim Gilbert, co-owners of Groundswell, are offering their customers an opportunity to invest in the shop and have a stake in its success.

They are forming a Founders Club Membership. For a $1,000 donation, the donor receives a free cup of coffee or tea or a free glass of wine or beer for the rest of his or her life.

“We realized not everyone could afford that amount, so for $500, you get the same for two years; for $250, you get the same for one year,” McCoy said. “If you calculate it out, you get your money’s worth. We need the capital, and the donor gets the free beverages.”

“We can go to the bank,” McCoy continued. “In fact, we will have to go to the bank. But it is much better to have people from the neighborhood help us with this. We need the money for our building, and we will provide a good return on the investment.”

McCoy said the owners of the building at 1342 Thomas Ave. thought the space would work as a coffee shop, but they realized after a year they were not suited to that business.

“They sold it to Erika Hiller, who partnered with J&S Bean Factory. That’s what it was when I moved here from Chicago,” McCoy said. Hiller sold the business, and it tanked, according to McCoy.

He and his neighbor, Tim, decided they could step in and try to resuscitate the shop, and they have been operating it the past three years with a lot of volunteer help.

But in September 2011 the ceiling collapsed. The doors were closed while the necessary repairs were made. The space was transformed and opened again after three months of work. This time a paid staff took over, and Groundswell partnered with Dogwood Coffee to train baristas. Both the owners worked other jobs but put in as much time as possible to continue to provide a gathering place for the Hamline Midway community.

In December 2012 the neighboring business, Borealis Yarns, closed its doors.

“When the yarn shop closed, we were sad to see it go,” McCoy related. “We had a good collaboration with them. A lot of people would knit and drink coffee.”

He said he and Gilbert were concerned about what type of business might take the yarn shop’s place. “We were worried that a chain or a tobacco shop might come in,” McCoy said. “So we got together with friends and talked about whether it was viable to expand.”

He said the original coffee shop was not really equipped for food; it didn’t have the space. In June, McCoy and Gilbert signed the lease for the former yarn shop space, and plans are in full swing to increase the scope of Groundswell Coffee.

Megan Gruelich will bake pastries for the shop. Johnny Becker serves as head chef and Jessie James will bring in arts and crafts from the neighborhood, allowing local artists to sell the pieces they make at home.

Gene Hartsock, owner of Hartland Shoe Repair, said he is glad the coffee shop is expanding. He moved his business to the St. Thomas and Hamline area in 1992. His building is about 60 years old and was formerly an alterations shop and then a coin dealer’s shop.

He recalled a stamp collector was once in the area and for many years a baseball card shop.

The building next door to him was built in the 1800s, and for awhile served as apartments for clergy members of St. Columba.

“This has been a good corner,” he noted, “four short blocks from University Avenue and right off Hamline.”

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Lyngblomsten wins 2013 award for workplace excellence

Lyngblomsten wins 2013 award for workplace excellence

Posted on 15 March 2013 by robwas66

Lyngblomsten_FeaturedStory

On Friday, February 8, Lyngblomsten received the 2013 Excellence in the Workplace Award from Aging Services of Minnesota. The Workplace Award honors an older adult services organization as an employer of choice for progressive practices that enhance employee satisfaction and retention, promoting careers in the field of senior services and investing in its employees. The Aging Services awards are among the highest honors for aging services organizations and professionals in Minnesota.

Paul Mikelson, President/ CEO, accepted the award for Lyngblomsten in front of an audience of 1,500 aging services professional colleagues who gathered in Minneapolis for the 2013 Aging Services Institute.

Lyngblomsten was founded by a group of Norwegian women who chose the name to honor their home country of Norway, where at the time the lyng was the national flower. Lyngblomsten has been home not only to the older adults who have lived here, but also a source of support and pride for families, employees, volunteers, congregations and neighbors who have helped build its legacy.

It’s also being honored as one of the great places to work. The organization offers scholarship funds to promote careers in older adult services and has formed partnerships with a number of outside organizations including local colleges, public schools, Easter Seals and the Jobs Corps. The scholarship program has assisted 29 employees who have been or are currently in LPN or RN programs.

Lyngblomsten has developed training for all staff in palliative, or comfort care. It was selected by The Struthers Parkinson’s Center to be a designated site in the east metro, and the staff is undergoing 12 months of intensive training on Parkinson’s Disease and other movement disorders.

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CentralStudents_FeatureStory

Gorilla Forest grand opening June 6

Posted on 15 March 2013 by robwas66

Gorilla_FeaturedStory

Como Park Zoo and Conservatory announces June 6, 2013 as the official
opening for Gorilla Forest. This $11 million exhibit redesign and overhaul will feature seven gorillas, six of whom are new to Como Zoo, and the largest all-mesh gorilla enclosure in North America.

Como Park Zoo and Conservatory announces June 6, 2013 as the official opening for Gorilla Forest. This $11 million exhibit redesign and overhaul will feature seven gorillas, six of whom are new to Como Zoo, and the largest all-mesh gorilla enclosure in North America.

The Gorilla Forest construction includes the addition of a major outdoor exhibit and significant improvements and expansions to the existing indoor facilities. All changes to the exhibit exceed the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) requirements for holding, exhibiting and managing great apes. The 13,000 square foot outdoor space, almost three times larger than the previous space, was designed to give the gorillas ample room to play, climb, forage and display their extraordinary family and social dynamics to the public while minimizing stress on the gorillas and creating up close and personal views of the gorillas for visitors.

The improvements to the indoor facilities, including the behind-the-scenes areas, were enlarged and could make mating these endangered species a possibility for Como. The new gorilla holding building provides plenty of natural light and two stories for the animals with view windows and perches so the gorillas can see out. Improvements to existing rockwork and trees will provide more horizontal space for gorillas and planned family groups. Better ventilation, lighting, drainage and a new rainforest mural on the dayroom wall will create an improved environment for the animals and viewing experience for the public.

While designing Gorilla Forest, Como emphasized the necessity of creating an enriching experience for guests as well as improving conditions for the animals. A recent study from the Institute for Learning Innovation found that children and adults who visit Como Zoo and similar facilities accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums ìleave the zoo thinking differently about their role in environmental problems.î Researchers noted that a zoo visit makes visitors feel they can make difference in solving environmental challenges, with significant increases in visitors who agree with the statements “There is a lot I can to do conserve” and “I am a part of the solution to nature’s problems.” Armed with this knowledge, Como designed this exhibit with the goal of informing and empowering the public, while maintaining a pleasing aesthetic experience.

The upcoming months at Como are not just about gorillas, though. The Ordway Gardens, a new wing on the Marjorie McNeely Conservatory & funded entirely by Como Friends, will have a Grand Opening Ribbon Cutting Celebration on April 19th.

The public is invited to festive weekend activities for both Gorilla Forest and The Ordway Gardens June 6-9 and April 19-21 respectively.

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Every Business Has A Story

Every Business Has A Story

Posted on 11 March 2013 by robwas66

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Discovery Club