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Home Energy Squad CEE 21

Home Energy Squad helps homeowners save energy, cut costs

Posted on 20 March 2020 by Tesha Christensen

By MARGIE O’LOUGHLIN
Last year, the Home Energy Squad made 750 visits to homes in St. Paul – helping homeowners reduce their energy bills by using gas and electricity more wisely.
Center for Energy and the Environment (CEE) Senior Marketing Account Manager Ashley Robertson said, “We deliver the Home Energy Squad services. CenterPoint Energy and Xcel Energy created the program, and anyone who is a customer of theirs is able to participate. We’ll send two energy consultants to your home to evaluate energy saving opportunities, and we’ll install energy saving materials as needed on the spot.”
These materials can include door weather stripping, a water heater blanket, a programmable thermostat, LED light bulbs, high-efficiency water fixtures, and insulating water heater pipe wrap.
Air leaks are a major source of heat loss in older St. Paul homes. During a Home Energy Squad visit, a technician will perform a blower door test to measure the severity of home air leaks. They will also complete an inspection of attic insulation and all exterior walls using an infrared camera.
Jarad Miles is an Energy Auditor and Field Supervisor with CEE. He said, “If a home needs air sealing or insulation, we can provide a quotes on-site and connect the client with qualified contractors. All of this can really increase the comfort of an older home in winter.
“We also test heating systems (furnace and boiler) for combustion safety. These heating systems should be checked every year by an HVAC professional for optimal performance. A malfunctioning gas heating or cooking system can leak carbon monoxide gas into the air.”
Usually the cost for a Home Energy Squad visit is $100. A home visit takes two and one-half to three hours. For a limited time, CEE is offering readers of the Monitor a reduced price of $50; mention this article when scheduling.
If a homeowner is income eligible (50% of the state median income or 110% of the federal poverty guidelines), there is no charge for a Home Energy Squad visit. A scheduler can help determine is a low-income waiver is appropriate.
For scheduling assistance, email hesscheduling@mncee.org or call 651.328.6220.
CEE provides financing for a range of home improvement loans with competitive rates, including financing for solar panel installations. Robertson said, “We also run programs for small businesses interested in optimizing their energy efficiency. Our energy advisors can help clients choose energy upgrades for their homes. We really want this to be a start-to-finish process.”
The St. Paul location of CEE houses the fleet of 25 Home Energy Squad vans and services, and is located in the Midway at 1754 University Ave. W.

“As a non-profit,
we believe that energy
efficiency is a practical way to increase environmental sustainability.”
~ Ashley Robertson

Better for your home
Home Energy Squad is provided by CenterPoint Energy and Xcel Energy. The program is delivered by CEE. What are the benefits?

• Energy-saving products installed by skilled technicians for a cleaner environment

• A healthier, safer, more comfortable home

• Information and solutions personalized for each home or business

• Reduced energy bills

 

DID YOU KNOW…
✓ For every degree you drop your programmable thermostat when you’re at work or sleeping, you’ll see a 1% savings in your gas bill per year (source: US Department of Energy). CEE suggests a setback of eight degrees.

✓ There are tax credits and rebates for energy upgrades such as adding insulation, high-efficiency furnaces, and more.

✓ A bathroom fan is an inexpensive alternative to an air exchanger. A healthy home requires good air flow between inside and out.

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Reusing electronic waste = free and affordable computers

Reusing electronic waste = free and affordable computers

Posted on 10 March 2020 by Tesha Christensen

PCs for People diverts electronics from waste stream, promotes digital inclusion

PCs for People Tech specialist Chang Yang tests more than 100 donated computers
every day. If a computer can’t be repaired, its usable components are refitted and
its unusable ones are recycled. Last year, PCs for People provided affordable computers and related technology to 804 customers in the 55104 zip code. At its most recent
community event in this part of St. Paul, 50 computers were distributed to families
at no cost. (Photo by Margie O’Loughlin) >> Read more on page 5.

By MARGIE O’LOUGHLIN
Last summer, PCs for People expanded to a 31,000-square-foot warehouse in the Como neighborhood. National communications and marketing director Tina Stennes said, “We were bursting at the seams. Our original location at 1481 Marshall Ave. is still our home-base for retail, but it was also our recycling and refurbishing space for 20 years.
“We’ve been able to increase both the scope and scale of our operations since we expanded. Our combined workforce in the two locations is now close to 50. One fifth of the employees at the warehouse are adults with disabilities.”
Stennes said, “Everybody that works here has a real passion for our mission, which is to provide income-eligible adults with equitable access to technology. In my previous job (in workforce development), I saw that lack of access to technology was a huge barrier to people trying to get ahead.”
PCs for People accepts donated computers – and other forms of digital technology – from individual and corporate donors. Items do not need to be in working order. Corporations are considerable donors because the average lifespan of digital technology in the corporate world is three years. There are a lot of digital electronics entering the waste stream.
The new warehouse is stuffed with used laptops, desktops, old typewriters, outdated cell phones, ancient car phones, hard drives, miles of USB cords, and every component imaginable, but there’s room for more. Email recycle@pcsforpeople.org to schedule a free pick-up of your used digital technology.
Privacy protection is a huge issue when it comes to refurbishing computers. Stennes explained, “We hold the highest industry certification for data security. The donor should do a data transfer prior to coming in, but we’ll do the rest. The computer is literally wiped clean of all personal information; the donor is given a transfer of ownership. We guarantee that the parts will be refurbished or responsibly recycled.”

Free computer events
PCs for People hosts about 10 community events each month, where they bring refurbished computers out into the community for distribution at no cost. Participating families are pre-selected using income eligibility based on the free and reduced lunch program guidelines. Most of these events take place in schools, and everything needed to operate the computers is included.
Stennes said, “In 2018, 60% of the customers we served through our community events or through our store had never owned a computer before. Often students know how to operate a computer, but their parents don’t. We follow up with new owners, providing tech support and digital literacy support. Every computer comes with a no-questions-asked one year warranty.”

Saytun Ahmed is a customer service representative at the Marshall Avenue store. She spent a day on the line in the new warehouse, getting a feel for the recycling process. (Photo by Margie O’Loughlin)

Affordable computers for sale
When a prospective customer enters the Marshall Ave. store, they are greeted by a customer service representative. Each customer provides income verification paperwork; acceptable forms are listed on the website www.pcsforpeople.org. Income eligible customers can purchase a desk top starting at $30 or a laptop starting at $50, which is approximately 1/10 of the used market value. Each refurbished computer comes with all new RAM, hard drive, Microsoft Word 10, and the same warranty as computers distributed through community programs.
Another point of removing digital barriers is having affordable access to the internet. Income eligible customers can choose to buy low cost internet (as low as $15/month). This service is prepaid, has high speed 4G, and runs off of a mobile hot spot.
“We want customers to have an experience in our store that is as professional as any other retail outlet, and we want them to leave with a computer that fully meets their needs,” said Stennes. “Customers often come back and tell us what they’ve used their computer for. Or, they’ll send an email saying, ‘This is the first email I’ve ever sent. Thank you!’”

PCs for People national communications and marketing director Tina Stennes said, “Last year, we provided affordable computers and related technology to 804 customers in the 55104 zip code. At our most recent community event in this part of St. Paul, 50 computers were distributed to families at no cost.” (Photo by Margie O’Loughlin)

PCs for People started in St. Paul, has expanded to Denver and Cleveland, and plans to open soon in Baltimore and Kansas City. If you are interested in their mission of digital inclusion and waste stream reduction in St. Paul, email volunteer@pcsforpeople.org to learn about volunteer experiences for groups. No tech experience is needed.

 

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Zero Waste Saint Paul is on a mission: to advocate, connect, and educate for a better environment

Zero Waste Saint Paul is on a mission: to advocate, connect, and educate for a better environment

Posted on 29 December 2019 by Tesha Christensen

By MARGIE O’LOUGHLIN

Erin Pavlica, co-founder of Zero Waste St. Paul and longtime Midway resident. During a recent Intro to Zero Waste training, she said, “We’re not expecting anybody to be perfect. Come as you are, and do what you can. ZWSP is a way to connect with others who have the same concerns. It can be lonely if you’re trying to challenge the status-quo all by yourself.” (Photo by Margie O’Loughlin)

Zero Waste Saint Paul (ZWSP) co-founder Erin Pavlica has a passion for low waste living. To hear her talk, that passion drives almost every aspect of her busy life.
The longtime Midway resident is an active member of the Hamline Midway Coalition’s Environment Committee, one of the driving forces behind the Facebook Barter/Sell page in Midway and Frogtown, and a principal player in the recent successful effort to ban black plastic and Styrofoam take-out containers in St. Paul (effective January 2021).
Pavlica offered a class through St. Paul Community Education on Nov. 19, called Zero Waste Recycling 101. She fielded questions about composting and recycling, and offered encouragement, as well as information. A few students were overwhelmed by the effort they thought was needed to adopt a zero waste lifestyle.
One myth about reducing waste is that householders need to buy a bunch of fancy stuff to get started, and Pavlica was quick to burst that bubble. She said, ”Almost everything I use as a zero waster comes from our kitchen, like mason jars. A lot of what we buy for our family of six comes from the bulk section of grocery stores and co-ops. I also carry my own silverware everywhere I go, even to parties. I might look kind of kooky, but I don’t care. Most of the events I go to would probably have compostable products, but those take energy to make too. I’d just as soon skip them. We have to be thinking about upstream pollution, as well as downstream.”
More than 40% of what goes into the trash is food scraps and other organic waste. Recycling food waste converts it to compost, which puts nutrients back into the soil in about 90 days. Ramsey County collection sites enable people to drop off food scraps that would otherwise be thrown in the trash – these are then processed into compost and used for gardening and landscaping.
Pavlica said, “A lot of people don’t think about food recycling, but it’s huge. If residents don’t use the drop-off organic waste sites or compost on their own, their food waste is trucked to the municipal incinerator and burned. Food waste is wet, heavy, and inefficient as a fuel source. The average American family of four wastes about $1,500 every year on food that’s just thrown away, so it’s a money issue, too.”
Pavlica had a long list of suggestions for people wanting to clean up their recycling as well. Since switching to no-sort (or single stream) recycling, the quantity of recycling in St. Paul has gone up – but the quality has gone down. They suggest downloading the new, more user-friendly app from Eureka Recycling to get the definitive answer on what is and is not recyclable.
Pavlica said, “Don’t ‘wish-cycle.’ Just find out what’s true.”

Top 10 suggestions for better recycling:
1 Anything smaller than your fist is not going to get recycled, and will likely just mess up the equipment at Eureka Recycling. For example, save reasonably clean tin foil once it is no longer usable. Keep smashing it into a firm ball until it is the size of your fist; then put the ball in your recycling bin for pick-up.
2 If you must use plastic water bottles, make sure they are empty before recycling. If a plastic bottle isn’t empty, it’s too heavy to be sorted at the MRF (Materials Recovery Facility). They use an air puffer to sort and direct plastics to the right place.
3 If you have a plastic bottle with a cap, screw the cap onto the bottle before tossing it in your recycling bin. The cap alone is too small to be recycled.
4 Recyclables should stay in their original shape (except cardboard boxes, which should be broken down.) For example, don’t crush aluminum cans to save space.
5 Do not recycle metal aerosol cans – they can explode. Put them in the trash.
6 Non-food related glass is not recyclable, because it is tempered and melts at a different temperature. Putting it in the recycling is wish-cycling.
7 Many plastic films can be brought to big box stores (CUB, Target, Home Depot) that have collection bins.
8 Dispose of unwanted, expired, and unused medications for free at public drop boxes in Ramsey County. The nearest location is the Ramsey County Law Enforcement Center at 425 Grove St. The CVS at Snelling and University avenues also accepts controlled substances, aerosols, inhalers, illicit drugs, and chemotherapy waste. Do not flush any medications down the drain. Note: CVS destroys the medications; they are unable to redistribute them.
9 When it comes to plastics, only numbers 1, 2, 4, and 5 can be recycled.
10 Holidays are the most wasteful time of the year. Between Thanksgiving and New Year’s last year, USPS, FedEx, and UPS together delivered around 2 billion packages in the U.S. Where is all that cardboard and plastic going—and what is it doing to the environment along the way? Buy local, reduce packaging, and skip the wrapping paper.

What can St. Paul residents bring to their Ramsey County drop-off site?

• Vegetables, fruits, meats (including fats, oils and grease), poultry, fish, bones, grains, dairy, coffee grounds and filters, and tea bags.

• Non-recyclable paper including greasy pizza boxes, paper towels, tissues, non-foil wrapping paper, and paper bags.

• Compostable cups, plates, utensils, and bags. Check for the compostable logo from the Biodegradable Products Institute (BPI) on the item or packaging to make sure it is compostable. Remember, composting is a process that requires air. If compostable products are put in the garbage, not the compost bin, they are no better than trash.

Upcoming events:

The ZWSP is offering a six-week Zero Waste Challenge Feb. 2-March 15 at the East St. Paul Mississippi Market. Cost is $45 for members/ $50 for non-members.

For a one-day primer, register for Saint Paul Composting 101 on Jan. 11 from 3-5 p.m. at Fly Freak Studio, 755 Prior Avenue North. Cost is $12. Or sign up for Intro to Zero Waste on Jan. 18 from 1-3 p.m. at Egg|Plant Urban Farm Supply, 1771 Selby Ave. Cost is $20.

For more information about upcoming events and classes, visit www.zerowastesaintpaul.com or check out their active Facebook community, Zero Waste Saint Paul Connections Group.

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Bluebell 422

Lawns to Legumes program will create new pollinator corridors

Posted on 12 December 2019 by Tesha Christensen

Homeowners may be eligible for funding to help boost Rusty Patched Bumblebee population

Staff from the partner organization Blue Thumb led a Lawns to Legumes workshop at North Regional Library earlier this month. The new state-funded Lawns to Legumes program will help residents convert at least part of their lawn to flowering plants that provide pollinator habitat. Minnesota is home to about 450 native species of bees, many of whose populations are declining. (Photo by Margie O’Loughlin)http://monitorsaintpaul.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/Web_Lawns-to-Legumes-02.jpg

By MARGIE O’LOUGHLIN
When the legislative session ended last year, Minnesota was granted something it has never had before: its own state bee.
The Rusty Patched Bumblebee was once among the most widespread of all wild bees seen in the Midwest, but its population nosedived in the early 2000s – it is now listed as an endangered species.
Minnesota is home to a significant number of the remaining Rusty Patched Bumblebees, and many are found in and around the Twin Cities. Bee experts believe homeowners can help this population of wild bees rebuild its numbers, one garden at a time.
At the close of last year’s legislative session, the Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources (BWSR) received $900,000 in state funding to develop a three-year pilot program focused on planting residential lawns with pollinator friendly plants. Other states are taking notice of the way Minnesota is funding this community-led program to protect and rebuild its diversity of pollinators.
The funding appropriation is through the Environment and Natural Resources Trust Fund. BWSR worked with local conservation partners throughout the summer to develop program criteria. Funding has been distributed to those partners (primary partners include Metro Blooms and Blue Thumb). Community workshops have begun state-wide, with garden projects slated to be planted in the spring and summer of 2020.
Funding will be targeted in areas benefiting the Rusty Patched Bumblebee and other at-risk species; Minneapolis and St. Paul are in the highest priority area, as are sections of Southeast Minnesota.

Traditional lawns don’t help pollinators much
Dan Shaw is a Senior Ecologist/Vegetation Specialist with the Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources. He said, “Bee and other pollinator populations are declining due to habitat loss, pesticide use, introduced parasites, and climate change. With Lawns to Legumes, we’re encouraging residents to transform their yards and gardens into places that support a diversity of wildlife.“
He continued, “Traditional lawns and non-native foundation plantings provide little benefit for pollinators. The idea is to restore natural habitat for wild bees, butterflies, hummingbirds, and a wide range of insect species – all of whom play a critical role in pollinating our food crops and native plants.”
Minnesota residents who have an area that can be used for outdoor planting can apply for a combination of technical assistance (workshops and coaching) and cost-share funding. Shaw anticipates that Lawns to Legumes will provide assistance to about 1,500 people in total.
Renters are also encouraged to participate in increasing pollinator habitat: either by getting permission from property owners to garden, or by planting pollinator friendly plants in pots.
The state’s efforts to provide critical habitat for the Rusty-Patched Bumblebee will also support Minnesota’s other pollinators and wildlife. Participating residents will be asked to provide before and after photos of their yards, and receipts for related expenses if they qualitfy for cost-share funding.

Apply in December
In December 2019, Blue Thumb will begin accepting applications from residents for the first round of individual support as part of the Lawns to Legumes program. Check the Blue Thumb or BWSR websites for updates and applications. Applicants can receive up to $350 of funding through a reimbursement process. Funding decisions will be made and all notifications emailed in February 2020 for spring garden installations.
• 2nd application round will open in March 2020, for summer and fall installations.
• 3rd application round for 2021 plantings may open depending on available funding.
Shaw explained, “In this partnership, BWSR is collaborating with a large group of conservation organizations around the state, as well as municipalities. As a small agency, we don’t have a lot of staff so we’ll be relying on our partners. We’ve been busy training our trainers. They include skilled volunteers in the conservation field like Master Naturalists, Master Water Stewards, Master Gardeners and others who are already well-grounded in environmental education. They’ll be participating in as many as 40 workshops for landowners across the state over the next three years.”
Another important contributor to the Lawns to Legumes program is the Minneapolis College of Art and Design. Students there are developing graphics and messaging for a social media campaign to raise awareness about residential pollinator plantings.

Be part of a movement
Shaw said, “Sometimes I see this more as a movement than a program. Every garden project we fund will have signage, so people can see that homeowners are making a difference.
“There hasn’t been much funding for homeowners to create pollinator habitat before. This is a fantastic opportunity for our conservation partners to collaborate, and to educate the public at the same time.”

Plant these Top 10
The goal of the Lawns to Legumes program is to create areas of habitat in both urban and rural residential yards that will provide food and shelter for bees and other pollinators. Even small plantings can make a big difference, especially if there are enough of them to provide a matrix or corridor. These are the top 10 plants recommended by Lawns to Legumes to sustain pollinators in Minnesota:
Virginia Bluebell (shown above)
Blazingstar
Golden Rod
Beebalm
Beardtongue
Milkweed
Aster
Wild White Indigo
Red Columbine
Blue Giant Hyssop

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Practicing what they preach

Practicing what they preach

Posted on 12 December 2019 by Tesha Christensen

CRWD building showcases native plantings, pocket park, rain gardens, tree trenches, permeable pavement, and more
By MARGIE O’LOUGHLIN

Midway resident Anna McLafferty said, “We can’t survive without healthy water. CRWD is helping to reduce the negative impact of people on the environment. We live in the neighborhood and our kids love the pocket park, especially the pond.”(Photo by Margie O’Loughlin)

Capitol Region Watershed District (CRWD) held its Grand Opening Celebration on Friday, Oct. 11. The new headquarters are located at 595 Aldine St. Following a ribbon-cutting ceremony, guests enjoyed local food from Los Ocampo, live music by the Americano Trio, art-making, kids’ activities, and building tours. CRWD broke ground on its new building in May 2018.
The transformed site includes a pocket park with a water feature, native plantings, and an interactive educational exhibit on the corner of Thomas Avenue and Aldine Street. Also visible are rain gardens, tree trenches, and permeable pavement. These features do the good work of collecting and cleaning rainwater by allowing it to soak into the ground, rather than creating storm water runoff.
Administrator Mark Doneux, said, “Our mission is to protect, manage and improve the water resources of Capitol Region Watershed District. The work of CRWD has grown immensely over the past 20 years. We are excited to be able to demonstrate best practices for managing storm water runoff here at our new office.”
Building tours showcased a rainwater capture system including a 3,000-gallon cistern, local art, reclaimed wood from nearby Willow Reserve, solar panels and many other sustainability features. The Backyard Phenology Project’s Climate Chaser was on site with their mobile lab to record and share stories of people’s observations about the changing climate.

Did you know…
CRWD, established in 1998, covers 40 square miles and includes portions of Falcon Heights, Lauderdale, Maplewood, Roseville and Saint Paul. CRWD is governed by a five-member Board of Managers that works to protect, manage and improve the water resources of the watershed district.

Emily Baskerville (right) and Suzy Lindberg (left) explored the outdoor, interactive water feature. Both are connected to CRWD through their work at Houston Engineering, and were pleased to see how the new headquarters reflects CRWD’s commitment to the arts and community. Lindberg said, “CRWD makes me proud of our St. Paul water.” (Photo by Margie O’Loughlin)

Janice Erickson (holding daughter Azalia) attended the grand opening with her family on Oct. 11. Her sons Rocky and Alexander are photographers participating in the “Our Sacred Water” exhibit, which received a Partner Grant from CRWD and was shown, in part, at the grand opening event. (Photo by Margie O’Loughlin)

 

Phyllis Panzer (left) attended the event with her son-in-law, Jordan, and grandson, Cooper. She said, “I’m here to celebrate that business and industry care enough to partner in the management of local water resources.” (Photo by Margie O’Loughlin)

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Web_FMR at Hidden Falls 48

Tags: , ,

Long buried toxic dump at Hidden Falls Park getting attention

Posted on 12 December 2019 by Tesha Christensen

The Mississippi River looks tranquil as it flows through Hidden Falls Regional Park, where people come to fish, hike, and relax. Just a few yards north of where this was taken, a cyclone fence separates parkland from Area C – a dump containing unknown quantities of toxic chemicals that are leaking into the river and ground water. (Photo by Margie O’Loughlin)

When the river rises, it rinses through the industrial waste which leaches into surrounding river and ground water

By MARGIE O’LOUGHLIN
Hidden Falls Regional Park is located along the Mississippi River bluffs just below Lock and Dam #1. Trails run through shady, wooded bottomlands; long stretches of sandy shoreline offer a reprieve from busy city life.
But a short hike north from the picnic shelters brings visitors to a tumble down cyclone fence that defines the northern park border. Called Area C, this is where the Ford Motor Company dumped unknown quantities of industrial waste onto the Mississippi River flood plain from 1945 to 1966 near its now closed St. Paul plant.
The location of Area C has been public information for years. The dumpsite looks benign, more neglected than threatening. It is covered with concrete, soil, and scrub vegetation. However, its contents are lesser known and almost impossible to quantify.
Friends of the Mississippi River (FMR) executive director Whitney Clark said, “Areas A and B were known dumps on Ford Redevelopment Site on top of the bluff (the former Ford Motor Company.) Their contents were moved to Area C in the 1960s, back when environmental standards were non-existent. The components of Area C fit into two categories. The largest category, which forms the top layer, is non-toxic construction debris. Underneath all of that lies an unknown quantity of toxic industrial waste contained in metal drums.

River corridor director and site leader Colleen O’Connor Toberman (right) talked with visitors about Area C, a toxic dump site owned by the Ford Corporation just upriver from Hidden Falls Regional Park. (Photo by Margie O’Loughlin)

“We believe that the quantity of toxic waste (including industrial solvents and paint sludge) is enormous.”
Because public pressure is so important, FMR staff and volunteers informed Hidden Falls Park visitors about the potential threat of Area C on Sept. 28, Oct. 5, and Oct. 12. Staff and volunteers gathered on site at the park in morning and afternoon sessions, and engaged visitors interested in learning more. Visitors were able to sign up for FMR updates and future meeting notifications. People using the park are likely to be among its strongest advocates and, once the snow flies, are much harder to reach.
At the request of FMR and the Capitol Region Watershed District, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) will hold a public information meeting in February 2020 to explain current site monitoring, requests for additional study, and long-term clean-up options. Contact site leader Colleen O’Connor Toberman at ctoberman@fmr.org to be notified of public meeting details, and to receive FMR updates on Area C developments.
Toxic waste is leaking from Area C into the river and groundwater at levels considered unsafe for humans. FMR and their partners are pushing for additional testing through the MPCA to ensure proper risk evaluation.
Clark said, “Modern dumps are lined with clay soils and other geo-technical materials that prevent leakage. Area C is nothing like that. It’s just a whole bunch of metal barrels sitting on the Mississippi flood plain, covered by a huge volume of construction debris. When the river rises, it inundates Area C – literally rinsing through the industrial waste, and leaching into surrounding river water and ground water. Metal barrels corrode, and some of them have been there since 1945.”
FMR has partnered with the Capitol Region Watershed District and MPCA to put added pressure on the Ford Corporation.
Clark said, “They have agreed to do a full spectrum feasibility study; this means that they could decide to do absolutely nothing when it’s over, or they could decide to haul all the debris away. We don’t believe that the investigation done to date has been adequate to inform their feasibility study. They need more extensive data.”
He continued, “That’s what we’re telling our constituents. We are pushing for the best-informed feasibility study, so that this situation can be dealt with ethically – not just legally. The Ford Corporation is in the process of selling the redevelopment site to Ryan Companies, but the river parcel (which contains Area C) will continue to be the Ford Corporation’s responsibility.”
Toberman concluded, “There’s a big gap between public information, and what people actually know about. All of the data that’s out there has been published by Ford the Corporation and its consultants, in partnership with the MPCA. This is an area that park visitors and neighbors are very interested in, and we look forward to having a great turnout for the public information meeting early next year.”

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Natural Burials 13

‘Green’ cemetery opens in Twin Cities

Posted on 10 October 2019 by Tesha Christensen

Catholic Cemeteries begins offering natural burials in three-acre restored prairie

 

Executive director Joan Gizek stood on top of the plot she has already purchased in the natural burial section of Resurrection Cemetery. She said, “I love the idea of coming into the world, and leaving the world, simply. I look forward to going back to the earth, to being part of creation. More than 100,000 tons of steel and 1,600,000 tons of concrete are used in the U.S. for traditional burials each year. Natural burial is the original recycling.” (Photo by Margie O’Loughlin)

By MARGIE O’LOUGHLIN
In the Catholic tradition, the body upon death is re-committed to the earth, “for we are dust, and to dust we shall return.”
Some people are taking this belief to heart again, with a desire to have a more organic, less industrial approach to death and burial.
The Catholic Cemeteries consists of five locations that have served the Twin Cities Catholic community since 1856. Their Resurrection Cemetery in Mendota Heights has recently become what is known as a hybrid cemetery. It contains a traditional cemetery, and a newly created natural burial allotment on a nearly three-acre restored prairie.
As gravesites in the allotment become occupied, native perennial flowers and grasses will cover them. Eventually, the natural burial area will become a peaceful, uninterrupted prairie maintained in perpetuity along with rest of the grounds.

What is a natural burial?
Catholic Cemeteries Executive Director Joan Gezik said, “We’ve been studying the natural burial concept for the last eight years. Our allotment was just blessed and dedicated by St. Paul Arch Bishop Hebda on Memorial Day 2019. Our mission is to bury the dead – not just Catholics. The first of several sections that we’ve opened can hold 40 graves, and we have sold over half of them.”
A natural burial cemetery can use machinery to dig graves, but no chemicals are used to prepare the bodies of the deceased or to maintain the cemetery grounds. In the natural burial process, the bodies of the deceased, and the earth to which they return, are treated with reverence.
In a natural burial, the deceased is placed directly into the ground where it decomposes naturally — without embalming fluid, and without a burial vault. The remains of the deceased are placed directly in the earth, allowing the body to decompose naturally.
If the body is clothed, the clothing must be made of natural fibers such as cotton, linen, wool, or silk that will decompose over time. The garments must be free of all plastic and metal such as buttons, zippers, and hooks. Jewelry, belt buckles, and other materials that are not biodegradable cannot be buried along with the deceased.
The body of the deceased may be washed, wrapped in a cloth shroud made of natural fiber, and placed in a grave – which at Resurrection Cemetery is dug to four feet deep. The wrapped body can also be placed in an open or closed container made of biodegradable material like pine, wicker, or bamboo.
Rather than placing individual headstones or markers on grave sites, the names of the deceased, along with their birth and death years, are listed on a permanent community monument in the natural burial area. The cemetery office will also maintain burial records, and a grid map with the approximate location of each burial site.
Costs associated with a natural burial are less than those of a conventional burial. The purchase of a gravesite includes a contribution to the permanent burial site care fund, and the cost of memorializing a name on the common memorial. The internment (grave opening and closing) fee is paid at the time of burial; with natural burial, no outer burial container is required by law.
The natural burial area at Resurrection Cemetery is located at the southwest corner of the Chapel Mausoleum. Access it from the front of the mausoleum by following the sidewalk along the west side of the building. Resurrection Cemetery is located at 2105 Lexington Ave. S. in Mendota Heights.

 

From then to now
When the body of Jesus was removed from the cross, it was washed, wrapped in a cloth shroud, and placed in a tomb. For many years, most burials took place in a similar manner. These practices changed in the U.S. around the time of the Civil War, when bodies were transported long distances for burial. By treating the body with embalming fluids to prevent decomposition, the body became suitable for transportation and for viewing.

Renewed interest in natural burial is influenced, in part, by people’s desire to honor their loved ones in a manner that is sensitive to the environment. The first “green” cemetery in North America was opened in South Carolina in 1998.

Inspired by Pope Francis
Pope Francis – whose reverence for nature led him to choose his papal name inspired by St. Francis of Assisi, the patron saint of ecology, is committed to the sanctity of nature and the need to protect it. The Pope asks Catholics to be mindful of the natural world, and to dedicate themselves to having a gentler impact on the planet.

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Citizens group reducing pollution in Como Lake

Citizens group reducing pollution in Como Lake

Posted on 11 August 2019 by Tesha Christensen

By MARGIE O’LOUGHLIN
Anyone who has walked or biked around Como Lake this summer has got to wonder, “What is that smell?”
The short answer is decomposing curly-leaf pondweed.
The long answer is more complicated.
At Capitol Region Watershed District (CRWD), Water Resource Project Manager Britta Belden described the life cycle of this invasive aquatic species, and why it causes such a problem in Como Lake.
She said, “Curly-leaf pondweed was first observed here in the early 1990s, and it now dominates the aquatic plant eco-system – with nearly 100% coverage by early June. It has done so well because Como Lake is a shallow lake with a maximum depth of 15’. Curly-leaf pondweed starts growing in late fall, from seedlings dropped in June. It continues growing through the winter beneath the ice, which gives it a competitive advantage.”

“When the ice goes out and sunlight hits the water in April, these plants really take off and grow rapidly.”
~ Britta Belden
She continued, “Curly-leaf pondweed forms thick mats of vegetation on the lake surface in the spring, and then quickly dies off in late June. This coincides with peak sunlight and high summer temperatures, providing perfect conditions for rapid decomposition – and that’s what people are smelling.”
Despite continued attempts to improve the water quality of Como Lake, its phosphorous levels are about three times higher than the state standards for shallow lakes. Once the curly-leaf pondweed starts to die, it releases a burst of phosphorous back into the water and, in a predictable cycle, is followed by a major algae bloom.

Phosphorous is not only present in Como Lake because of decomposition, it’s also being transported in runoff to the lake.
To address this problem, CRWD invests in projects and partnerships that reduce nutrients and other pollutants in watershed runoff. In one such partnership, CRWD supports a neighborhood group called the Como Active Citizen Network; their Como Curb Clean-Up is a coordinated effort to remove leaves and other organic material from neighborhood streets for six weeks in the fall.
This program has about 100 participants – all of them committed to improving the water quality of Como Lake through this practice.
Janna Caywood is a founding member of the Como Active Citizen Network, and a Como resident for more than 20 years. She said, “We’re a group of neighbors who care about our nearby lake.
“We’re not the leaf police but we believe that, as property owners, we have the ability to impact our neighborhood positively. By keeping the curbs and gutters clean in front of our houses, we can prevent additional phosphorous from getting into Como Lake through run-off.”

“Many people mistakenly believe that phosphorous in commercial lawn fertilizers is the culprit, but it’s decaying organic matter (leaves and grass clippings) that really throw Como Lake out of balance.”
~ Janna Caywood
Part of the problem is that Como Lake is being asked to do more than it realistically can. Caywood explained that there are no longer any natural tributaries delivering fresh water to the 70 acre lake. She said, “With 22 storm sewers draining into such a small lake, it has essentially become a glorified storm water basin. Yet, because of its location, we expect it to perform as a recreational amenity – and a natural amenity, too.”
Caywood said, “This kind of ‘non-source’ pollution is the hardest to address, because it’s coming from St. Paul, Roseville, and Falcon Heights through the storm water system. We see this as a great challenge for our generation, figuring out how to deal responsibly with the impact of human living on our waters.”
Looking ahead, the Capitol Region Watershed District will begin implementing new management strategies for Como Lake next year. Its 20-year Como Lake Management Plan contains 54 actions designed to improve the health of this much-loved neighborhood gathering spot. To better understand Como Lake both past and present, follow the link below to view a story map developed by the Capitol Region Watershed District. www.capitolregionwd.org/comolake

 

“Minnesota has a great responsibility for managing its lakes wisely. As a state, we are second only to Alaska in the amount of surface water that we have.”
~ Janna Caywood, Como Active Citizen Network

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August Monitor 48

Pies on the Prairie

Posted on 11 August 2019 by Tesha Christensen

Surprise – there’s Pierce Butler Meadows just before the Snelling Ave. crossing

By MARGIE O’LOUGHLIN
The Pierce Butler Route is known as a short cut through the Midway and Central neighborhoods of St. Paul. It runs, usually without congestion, all the way from Prior Ave, to Dale St. The surrounding area is mostly industrial, but just before Pierce Butler Route crosses under Snelling Ave. – there’s a surprise.
Pierce Butler Meadows is a small patch of native prairie growing on the southwest corner of that intersection. It starts along Pierce Butler Route as a cattail-lined pool, and gives way to swamp white oak and serviceberry seedlings, interspersed with 1,500 native plants and grasses, rising up the hillside.
Planted in October 2017 by teachers and students from Hamline Elementary, Hamline University, and the Hmong Preparatory Academy, countless Hamline Midway neighbors, and Hamline Midway Coalition staff (HMC), the newly-established Pierce Butler Meadows is in full bloom.
Prairies once stretched across western and southern Minnesota; less than 1% of the Minnesota native prairie remains today.
Prairies are sometimes called upside-down forests because much of the plant and animal life they support is below ground. Many prairie plants have roots five feet deep or more.
Extensive root systems improve the ability of water to infiltrate soil, which reduces runoff. Deep roots decrease erosion by anchoring soil. Prairie plants also store carbon, which keeps the soil healthy.

Attend prairie events
With the help of a partnership grant from the Capitol Region Watershed District, HMC is hosting three events called “Pies on the Prairie” at Pierce Butler Meadows this summer. The dates are Aug. 17, Sept. 21, and Oct. 5 from 10 a.m.-noon.
Each of the Saturday programs will offer different activities. Hear neighbors share their expertise about prairie flowers, prairie birds, bee keeping, water use in a prairie eco-system, and more. All ages are welcome, and the zero-waste event promises PIE. There is no cost to attend, and no registration is needed. Attend one or all of the programs.
HMC’s Melissa Michener said, ”’Pies on the Prairie’ is part of our work to build community engagement through clean water education. This is one of the ways we connect with residents, by showing how we can support cleaner water in the Hamline Midway neighborhood.”
For their ongoing efforts at the Pierce Butler Meadows, HMC received a Watershed Project Award from the Capitol Region Watershed District. The award recognizes a project that demonstrates excellence in protecting, managing, and improving local water resources within the watershed. The Pierce Butler Meadows came out of more than a decade of community interest in and activism on the site. Without the dedication of HMC’s Environment Committee and resident Steve Mitrione, the project would not have happened.
Contact Melissa Michener at Hamline Midway Coalition with questions about “Pies on the Prairie.”(Melissa@hmc.org) There will be parking on nearby Taylor Ave., and volunteers to help at the crossing on the west side of Snelling Ave.

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GrottoHoueInsideIMG_6639

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Happy centennial, Grotto House

Posted on 11 August 2019 by Tesha Christensen

By TESHA M. CHRISTENSEN
Seven years to the day they bought the house at 1012 Grotto St., Emily and Jesse and their 10-pound Chihuahua Buster Busta held a party.
Their home – which they lovingly call the Grotto House – is 100 years old.
And that’s something to celebrate.

Know where you’re coming from
The Bustas bought the house on July 27, six weeks before they wed in 2012.
They met at age 14 while growing up in the east metro, graduated from Tartan High in Oakdale in 2007, and started dating in 2008. They attended school in St. Paul (he at Hamline Law School and she at Bethel University), and decided they wanted to stay in the city.

Emily fostered a love of old houses while growing up inside an 1888-era home in Highwood Hills by Pigs Eye Lake.
“You need to know where you’re coming from to know where you’re going,” Emily stated.
“Emily turned me on to old houses and I love them now,” remarked Jesse.
His dad, Brent Katzemmaier, who grew up near Como Lake, found the foreclosure along Grotto St. They had looked through about five houses before touring this one, and had been looking for an affordable price as Jesse was still in school.
“We saw it and we knew,” Emily recalled.
“I love the character – it’s not a cookie cutter [house],” observed Emily. “No one else has something like this. It’s cozy and not huge.”
They’re not entirely sure of the size of the two-story house, as written reports vary from 900 to 1,200 square feet. There’s an unfinished basement, with main level living room, kitchen, dining room, small bedroom/study and mud room, and two bedrooms with ample walk-in closets and a bathroom upstairs.
The purchase required patience, as the process with the bank took seven months. At one point, they discovered water pooled on the dining room floor. A leak from the second story bathroom trickled down and damaged the ceiling, wall and floor in their dining room. It cost $5,000 to fix, but was covered by the bank.
One of their first steps was gutting and redoing the one bathroom in the house. They worked to match the house’s period and style, but did add the convenience of a heated floor.
Upstairs windows were replaced with new wooden Pella ones. New lights resemble antique ones.
“We tried our hardest to keep original features and the character of the house,” said Jesse.
They ripped the carpet and asbestos tile off the upstairs floors to reveal oak beneath, which they refinished. Unfortunately, they weren’t able to remove the carpet and tile in the living room to reveal the wood there so they settled for new carpet. But just in time for the Centennial, they redid the fir floors in the main level bedroom that had been added to the house at a later time.
“Otherwise it was in pretty good shape,” said Jesse.
The original buffet and plate rail in the dining room stayed, and they didn’t need to make changes to the kitchen.

A big move in 1966
A home inspector clued them in on the fact that their 1919 house had a cinder block foundation, which meant it hadn’t always been at 1012 Grotto.
Last fall they began researching the history of their home’s move. They checked out property tax records, and learned it had been moved from Snelling and Randolph in 1966, and the property transitioned from residential to commercial. It used to sit at what is now the busy intersection of Snelling and University at 475 S. Snelling. The Bustas don’t know what was at 1012 Grotto before their house was moved in.
They do know that the woman, Mary Ann Kester, who moved their home also moved in the house directly south of them. It had originally been at 1510 St. Clair.
From the building permit, they discovered that the house cost $3,000 to construct. Another document from the time of the move showed costs at $1,200 was for concrete block, $2,000 for the movers, $750 for electric, and $1,000 for the plumbers.
Since they bought the house for $88,000, the property value has doubled. “We were in the right place at the right time,” said Emily.

A starter home for many
“I like knowing who came before us in the house,” stated Jesse.
They’re learned that their house has mostly been a starter home for the families that came before them.
Property tax records through the house’s move in the 1940s show that the longest anyone lived at 1012 Grotto was twelve years. “We appear to be the eighth family that has lived here at this site,” said Jesse. They do not have the titles from the time the house was on Snelling Ave.
It was public housing for 13 years after Kester sold the house to the St. Paul Urban Housing and Redevelopment Authority for $1 in 1969.
About five years ago, a car stopped and a woman told them she grew up in their house in the 1970s. She left before they could get any more details. The Bustas hope to learn more about the history of their house, and hope past residents share information with them.

‘They’re not as scary as you think’
Jesse now works for Progressive Insurance in New Brighton, and Emily recently took a job with the state of Minnesota’s education office at Bandana Square. They’ve sold their second car, and Emily enjoys biking to work.
They’re planning to become the longest living family at this address.
“We hope people can grow an appreciation for old houses and keep them in the neighborhood,” said Jesse. “And keep old churches too,” Emily added.
“They’re not as scary as you think they are.”
“They definitely take more work to maintain but it’s worth it in the end,” said Jesse. “The charm wins out.”
~ Contact the editor via email at tesha@MonitorSaintPaul.com.

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